We’re hiring!

Please apply with resume and cover letter by 2/9, 5pm. Email to latahrecoverycenter@gmail.com, or mail to Latah Recovery Center, 531 S Main, Moscow, ID 83843.

Latah Recovery Center

Re-Entry Case Manager

Job Description

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Salary Range: $20.00 min DOE

General Information:        

This is a full-time position that reports directly to the Latah Recovery Center (LRC) Executive Director and works with officials at the Latah County Jail.

Summary:                

Long-term viability of this position is dependent on the Case Managers ability to successfully implement the 2021 Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Re-Integration grant.

This position works with participants entering LRC programs thru incarceration at the Latah County Jail.  The Re-Entry Case Manager works in concert with Recovery Coaches to provide pre- and post-release support with comprehensive planning and connection to resources that are not only a requirement for release but also foundational to success in carrying out the reentry plan. These resources support and assist with sober living using the tools and staff available at the Center. Assists individuals with planning and resource identification and application prior to release, so they have a clear path outlined when reentering the community. The case managers goal for all participants is to establish more resources to be available to inmates at the outset of release, to include food, clothing, and personal.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities: 

The Re-Entry Case Manager shall be responsible for the following:

  1. Serve as lead on the progress of the proposed enhanced reentry services.
    1. Coordinating the development and proposal of project goals, timelines, evaluations, and routine reports with the Latah Recovery Center Director as well as participating in any necessary communications, site visits, and progress reports with IDHW.
  2. Case management as returning citizens navigate thru Treatment Court Phases 1-4 (Early Recovery, Decision Making, Community Transition and Aftercare) or are otherwise identified by county staff, including ongoing follow-up in first 6 months after release.
    1. Individualized re-entry planning-including a “1st day of re-entry” plan for familiarizing with local resources.
    1. One-on-One connection with resources thru working with local agencies and peer support
    1. Track peer progress via Idaho Response to the Opioid Crisis and Latah Recovery Center intake information; and recurring data collected-including required GPRA (intake, three and six month, or discharge), program participation data, and quarterly recovery capital assessment
  3. Work with staff and volunteers to improve existing peer coaching program while incorporating returning citizens/peers into the existing program.
  4. Attend all monthly peer planning meetings, work in conjunction with Recovery Coaches to help peers grow in their recovery.
  5. Cultivate positive collaboration within the team, peers, jail and other major community partners in the re-entry program. 
  6. Support growth and program development in all areas of the Centers.
  7. Keep current peer documentation, reports and proposals. 
  8. Other duties as assigned by the Executive Director.

Supervisory Responsibilities:   

If appropriate the Re-Entry Case Manager will supervise bachelor level non-licensed peer specialists and recovery coaches relative to their work in implementing the grant.   

Job Relationships: 

The Re-Entry Case Manager will maintain regular published office hours, peer appointments, attend all regular staff meetings, appointed board committee meetings and board of director’s meetings, as assigned.  They will establish and maintain regular contact with the Executive Director, Rural Crisis Center Network Manager, board committee chairs, recovery and re-entry related community resources, and awareness of agency-wide issues.

Qualification Requirements/Education and/or Experience:   

BA in Human Services or related field

Language Skills:   

Excellent written and verbal English is required.  

Mathematical and Computer Skills:     

Knowledge of Electronic Health Record software such as WITS or ability and willingness to learn are required.

Ethical Considerations:

  • The Recovery Center believes in Harm Reduction approaches, and maintains a Safe Syringe Exchange, naloxone and condom supply.
  • Confidentiality protocol applies to all interactions with participants and co-workers. Confidentiality involves maintaining secure consumer and internal agency information. HIPAA and other privacy regulations apply. 
  • The Clinical Crisis Intervention Specialist supports both Centers policies, goals and mission at all times. 
  • Political and social awareness are necessary professional characteristics required by the unique nature of work in a corrections atmosphere.

Warm, Warmer, Hot

by Nancy Casey

What warms things up? What makes you warm? What is the difference between warm enough and too warm? What line is crossed when warm becomes hot?

Think about the answers to those questions and the ideas they lead to as you set up your page.

To set up the page, draw a line across the top where your title will go. You can also draw a box or blob that you’ll use for illustration. Or make a frame along the edges that you can decorate. Set up your page with the intent of calming and focusing your mind and turning its attention to the writing task ahead.

You could write about the things that you do, consciously or unconsciously, to prepare yourself to keep warm on a winter day: the clothes and accessories you choose, where you position yourself, what you do or refrain from doing, plans that you make.

Perhaps you have a responsibility for the warmth of people or things outside of yourself: plants, pets, a family member, a car… How do you warm them? Do you have a job or other daily activity that involves warmth somehow?

As you write, you can expand your thoughts beyond physical warmth. What has warmed your heart? What can warm a relationship that’s turned cold? What is the purpose of the warm-up part of activities like sports, music, groups and classes?

Sometimes things, people, or situations go beyond getting warm and become hot. What happens when you are physically hot? What about hot tempers or the form of hot that makes you get every answer right on a test—and fast? It can mean all kinds of different things when one person calls another one hot—what is your experience of that?

Keep your mind under the umbrella of warm and hot as you fill up the page. Don’t plan too much, simply begin writing at the top and keep putting down ideas until you get to the bottom. Perhaps you will write a string of almost-random thoughts. Maybe you will tell one story—or just a part of one.

If you add illustration to your page, you could use warm colors like red, orange and yellow and see if that warms up your ideas more.

When the page is full, look it over carefully and make small changes if you like. When a title idea floats to the surface of your mind, write it at the top of the page.

Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like some help with your writing, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center. In-person Write-for You classes have been suspended for now, but when Covid recedes, they will return.

Sparkles

by Nancy Casey

Brief and sudden pinpricks of light—glints and glimmers, shimmers and sparks. Write about some of them today.

They can hurt your eyes or cause delight. They might surprise you. Maybe you cause them. Maybe they aren’t quite made of light.

Think about sparkly things while you set up your page. Draw a line at the top where the title will go when you have finished. You can also draw a box or blob that you’ll use for illustration. Drawing and doodling relax your mind and leave a record of the moment on the page. So they are a form of writing, too.

The world is full of things that sparkle and glimmer. Sunlight on soapsuds. The spark that causes the flame on a match or lighter. The surprise flash you see when you hook up jumper cables. What you see when you press your palms (gently!) against your eyelids…

If you like, take yourself on a little tour of your world looking for sparks. It might be especially interesting if you venture out after dark.

Sometimes thoughts or events arrive in our life like bursts of light. Sparks of insight and recognition. Glimmers of hope or understanding. Flashes of anger. Ripples of laughter.

Some sparks flash and then fade. Others start conflagrations that cannot be controlled.

Let your mind float around in possibilities about glints and glimmers, shimmers and sparks. Don’t wait around for a perfect idea. Write down the first one that flashes into your mind and keep going from there, alternating between writing and drawing if that’s something that works for you.

When you get to the bottom of the page, stop. Look back over what you have done. Make small changes if you like. Give your work a title. Put a signature or your initials on it, and write the date, too.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

If you want to write more than a page, get out a clean sheet of paper and start a new one. Try writing one page on this same sparkly topic every day. The results will probably surprise you.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like some help with your writing, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center. In-person Write-for You classes have been suspended for now, but when Covid recedes, they will return.

Straight

by Nancy Casey

You can go straight. Get straight. Act straight. Walk straight. Look straight. Think straight. See straight…

There’s straight up, straight down, straight to, straight past, straight over, straight through…

Think about all the things you could say and think that have the idea of straight in them somewhere. Let your mind wander around these thoughts as you draw a line across the top of your page where your title will go. Set aside some space for illustration. (If you would rather draw than write, make the illustration space really big.)

Start drawing in the illustration space if you like, and invite your mind to keep  thinking thoughts (and tell itself jokes) about the many different ideas connected to the word straight.

Rather than wait for some “good idea” about straight come into your mind when you start writing, write down whatever thought about straight comes tumbling through your mind as your pen hits the paper in the writing space. Even if it’s not the one you were planning to write a nanosecond before.

Then keep going wherever your thoughts lead you, and take note of everything that’s straight along the way.

If you tell a story, put as many straight details in it as you can think up or remember. Use the word straight as much as you can, even if it seems to make your story turn goofy. Even if the story doesn’t get told by the time you’ve reached the end of the page.

You could decide to write something more like a list, jumping around from one straight thing or idea after another.

When you get to the bottom of the page, stop. Read over what you wrote. Do you find connections that you didn’t really plan to put there? Sometimes those kinds of connections can help you think up a title.

Whatever title you decide on, write it at the top of the page. Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

If it turns out you had more ideas about straight than could fit on one page, call the page “done” and the get out a clean sheet of paper and start a new one, same way you did the first one. Keep writing individual pages that way. You would probably get tired of writing pages about straight before you ran out of ideas.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like some help with your writing, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center. In-person Write-for You classes have been suspended for now, but when Covid recedes, they will return.

Many Times

by Nancy Casey

It’s a New Year’s tradition in our society to make a list of things that you hope you will do (or not do) in the coming year. But what about all the things that you know you are going to do? The ones you don’t have to resolve to do because you are going to do them no matter what. Today, write about some of the things that you know you will do in the coming year not just once, but many times.

Give that some thought as you set up your page. Draw a line across the top where your title will go. You can also draw a box or blob that you’ll use for illustration. You can start to draw or doodle in the illustration space while you stretch your mind to imagine the whole year ahead of you.

Imagine the meals that you will eat and the people you will encounter. Think about your habits—thoughts and actions—without judging them to be good or bad. Remind yourself of all the obligations you will fulfill, both to yourself and others. Are there things that you do over and over again at your job? With your family? Just for fun? Don’t forget life’s basic maintenance activities, such as laundry, brushing your teeth, or putting on shoes. Are you planning to breathe? To go outside? To walk, drive, bike, or take the bus? Will you be picking up stuff and putting it down somewhere else?

Write some sentences that have this form:

By________, I will have _______ many times.

In the first part, set a deadline: By the end of the month…. By the time summer comes… By April… By my birthday….

In the second part, name something that you are certain to have done many times by then.

After that, you can add some more to what you wrote. You could explain why you know you will have done this many times or tell why you do it and whether or not you like doing it. If you don’t have anything else to say, just start again with a new one:

By________, I will have _______ many times.

Fill up your page with ideas that match this pattern. By the time you reach the end, you will have made a list of predictions about yourself that you are certain will come true.

Add an illustration or some other decoration to the page if you want to. When you are completely finished, look the whole page over carefully. Make small changes if you like.

When a title idea floats to the surface of your mind, write it at the top of the page.

Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like some help with your writing, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center. In-person Write-for You classes have been suspended for now, but when Covid recedes, they will return.

Quarterly Accomplishments

by Nancy Casey

When one year ends and another one begins, we have a tradition of both looking forward and looking back. Today’s writing is an opportunity to look back and remember what you did well in the past year.

It’s not easy to recall a whole year at once. When the temperatures plunge and the snow piles up, you likely stop thinking about what was happening and what you cared about when the days were long and the temperatures were sweltering. In this exercise, you will divide the year into quarters and think back over your year in chunks that are three months long.

Allow your mind to begin floating through your memories of the past year as you set up your page. Draw a line at the top of the page where your title will go. If you want to set aside a box or blob for illustration, put it in the middle of the page. Next, draw a line across the page an inch or two from the bottom. Then draw lines to divide the remainder of the page—your writing space—into four equal parts. As you do this, mentally divide the past year into four equal parts as well.

Label one of the writing spaces Jan/Feb/Mar. Label another one Apr/May/Jun. Label the other two Jul/Aug/Sept and Oct/Nov/Dec. In each one of those spaces, make some notes about some of the things that you accomplished during those months.

Great big accomplishments tend to stand out in memory: having a baby, completing a big project, renouncing a destructive habit, learning a new skill. These are the types of things that other people might notice and congratulate you for.

Some accomplishments are no less important, although they might be invisible to other people: living through another day of grief, holding your tongue, forgiving yourself, being on time, listening to another person, changing your routine.

Everything you have done that required focus and effort is an accomplishment.

Reviewing an entire year is a big project. You can skip from one quarter to another as you remember things that you accomplished. Maybe it will work best for you to carry the page around for a while and note the accomplishments as they filter slowly into your memory. Decorating the borders that divide the sections can also help your mind open up to let the year’s accomplishments in.

When you have filled up each of the four sections, read over what you have written. In the remaining space at the bottom of the page, write one last thought about the year’s accomplishments. This can be any kind of comment about anything you have written above it.

When the whole page is full, look it over carefully one last time. When a title floats into your mind, write it at the top of the page.

Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You might find it interesting to do this exercise several days in a row. After all, a whole year has gone by. You can’t fit it all into four little spaces. The more you think about it, the more you will realize how much you have accomplished.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like some help with your writing, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center. In-person Write-for You classes have been suspended for now, but when Covid recedes, they will return.