Round

by Nancy Casey

The world is round. So are many of the things in it. Write about some of them today.

To think about roundness, begin with your senses. What round things can you see, touch, hear, smell or taste? Consider the roundness all around you as you set up your page. How can you tell if something is round?

Draw a line at the top of the page where the title will go so you are certain to have a place to put it when you have finished writing. If you don’t feel relaxed and ready to write, doodle or draw on the page and allow your mind to slow down and open up.

So many round things! Some, such as Frisbees and plates are round and flat. Others, such as softballs and peas are round, no matter how you move them about. A carrot is round in a different way. So is a baseball bat. Some objects that are not round—a car engine, for example—have many parts inside them that are round.

Intangible things can be round, too. Some thoughts and ideas keep “coming back around.” Can something act round? Or seem round?

We say that “what goes around comes around.” What goes? What comes? And what is it going and coming around?

As soon as a thought about something round enters your mind, write it down. Don’t pressure yourself to write something witty or brilliant, just write something. The wit and the brilliance will sneak up on you when you quit demanding it.

As your writing gets going, see where it takes you. Maybe it will turn into a catalog of round things. Partway down the page, it might turn into a story. Perhaps you will find yourself getting philosophical about what “roundness” is—or isn’t.

When your page gets full, go back over your work carefully. Squeeze in any additions or corrections that you think it needs. Add some color or illustration if there is empty space that needs to be filled in. See if a title will float to the surface of your mind.

If you can’t think of a title, here’s a trick: Write a really bad title in tiny letters at the top of the page. Sometimes that will make the part of you that second-guesses yourself provide a better one in a flash. If it does, write it in bigger letters above the first one.

Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like some help with your writing, or just some encouragement,  contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

The Story of a Shoe (or Two)

by Nancy Casey

How many shoes do you suppose have stepped through your life?

Walking shoes, running shoes, traveling shoes, crying shoes.

Sneakers, slippers, sandals, flip-flops, work boots.

Fashionable and unfashionable shoes. The shoes that hurt your feet and the ones that don’t. Shoes you don’t like. Shoes you covet.

Today, begin with a shoe—or two. Fill a page with story from your life that has at least one shoe in it. It can be a story that reflects true events, or one that comes from your imagination. Or some combination of the two.

You can consider a shoe worn by you, or by anyone. Or even a shoe (or two) that nobody has worn.

You could even write about a brake shoe if that’s the story that pops into your mind.

Maybe you will want to tell the story from the point of view of the shoe.

Begin with a shoe (and possibly its mate) and tell the story. If the story is pretty short and there is still room on the page, tell another story. About that same shoe, or a different one. Or instead of additional stories, you could fill the remainder of the page with drawing.

Drawing or doodling on the page can help your mind relax and think more clearly. You don’t have to write down everything you think of while you were drawing. The drawing itself—no matter what it “looks like”—will stand in for all the thoughts you had while you made it. Regardless of what (or how) you draw, your mind will be a bit clearer for having done it.

When the page is full, look it over slowly. Leave a corner of your mind empty and ask yourself what the title should be. See what kind of title pops into that empty space.

Write your title at the top of the page. Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. In-person Write-For-You classes could be returning to the Recovery Center before too long—but not yet! If you would like some help with your writing, or just some encouragement,  contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

Starting With a Tree

by Nancy Casey

Trees. Those “one legged” living things that can subsist on water and sunshine for hundreds of years. The more you learn about them, the more amazing they are. They exhale oxygen and are home to zillions of living things. They give us food and shade. Some of them are poisonous.

Today, write (and illustrate?) a page that begins with the idea of a tree.

Draw a line at the top of the page where the title will go so you are certain to have a place to put it when you have finished writing. Then pause for a moment and let the idea “tree” settle into your mind.

You can begin with one specific tree in front of you. Or an object which started out as some part of a tree. You could decide to begin with a memory of a tree, or the idea of a tree that you construct in your imagination. Maybe you know some interesting information about trees and will start there.

Once you begin, keep your writing hand moving while your mind relaxes into thoughts that start with a tree.

You could tell a story from your life that has a tree in it. Or several of them. Or make a list of the titles of stories with trees in them that you could tell if you had all the time in the world.

You could decide to make and comment on a list of all the ideas that pop into your head after you start thinking about trees. They could be about trees in general, trees you have observed, how to make something out of a tree (or wood), or how to care for a tree.

You can organize the tree-thoughts that come into your mind alphabetically if you choose.

Drawing or doodling on the page can help your mind relax and think more clearly. Try that if you aren’t sure what to write about. Or illustrate your page after you have finished writing, staying open to a good idea for a title that might float to the surface of your mind while you draw.

Write your title at the top of the page. Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. In-person Write-For-You classes could be returning to the Recovery Center before too long—but not yet! If you would like some help with your writing, or just some encouragement,  contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

What Would Rumpelstiltskin Do?

by Nancy Casey

Do you know the tale of Rumpelstiltskin? It’s the one where the heroine is locked up in a barn and, under pain of death, must spin a pile of straw into gold overnight. Rumpelstiltskin appears and does it for her while she sleeps. There are a few plot twists and some scary consequences for accepting this gift, but ignore those for the moment and ask yourself this question:

If Rumpelstiltskin popped into my life some evening, what miracles would I want him to accomplish by morning?

Do you have a pile of straw that you wish could be turned into gold?

Consider all those onerous tasks that you procrastinate.

Perhaps you dream of a big change in your life or circumstances that feels impossible right now. Or ever.

Maybe you want something that others would call frivolous and unnecessary. Rumpelstiltskin doesn’t judge–ask away!

You aren’t limited to asking for yourself. Maybe you would like to orchestrate something new for someone that you know.

You can even look to the big wide world and invite the Rumpelstiltskin character to alter it in some way.

Let your daydreaming mind wander and see if it can find changes that you dream about even though they feel impossible from where you are now. What magic and miracles would you have Rumpelstiltskin perform for you?

Unfortunately, Rumpelstiltskin also extracts huge payments for his services. You can ignore that part of the story for now. Even if Rumpelstiltskin were real, he can’t make you pay for giving him a list! What would you have him do for you?

Daydream about these things as you set up your page. Draw a line at the top of the page where the title will go. Set aside some space for illustration. Or make a frame around the edges of the whole page and you can fill with decoration.

Wander through your favorite dreams. Imagine a scenario where, before you go to sleep tonight, Rumpelstiltskin will appear and offer to do everything on your list while you sleep. What will you find in the morning?

When you have finished the page, read over what you have written. Illustrate your work if you haven’t already. Think up a title that ties everything together.

Write your title at the top of the page. Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. In-person Write-For-You classes could be returning to the Recovery Center before too long—but not yet! If you would like some help with your writing, or just some encouragement, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

Where is the Air?

by Nancy Casey

You can get by without a lot of things, but air is not one of them. Fortunately, there’s air just about everywhere a person is likely to go. There are also ways to carry air with you if you happen to be going somewhere like outer space or the bottom of the sea. Without it, you couldn’t go there—or if you did, you couldn’t stay very long.

Yet air can be hard to notice. You don’t even have to pay attention to it to breathe.

Today in your writing, describe some of the ways that you perceive air.

Set up your page by marking off a space for a title and space for an illustration. As you do so, ask yourself how air could possibly figure in to doing that.

Consider each of your senses. What do your eyes, ears and nose tell you about air? Can you taste it? What are some of the ways that you can feel air on your skin? What does air do in a storm?

Sometimes we notice air because of the way it changes things around. What moves on a windy day? What happens when you put your face in front of a fan? What are some of the other signs of moving air?

Many things can be carried to you on the air. Some of them are pleasant and some are downright harmful. What has air brought to you lately? Did it float in or arrive in a blast?

There are many machines that don’t work without air. A vacuum cleaner, for instance, or a car engine. Why do some machines have fans in them?

What is the relationship between air and fire? Wind can whip up flames and make a fire grow, yet it can also blow a candle out. Why is that?

Fill up a page today by telling a story from your life—or several different stories—that have something to do with air.

When you have finished the page, read over what you have written. Illustrate your work if you haven’t already. Think up a title that ties everything together.

Write the title at the top of the page. Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. In-person Write-For-You classes could be returning to the Recovery Center before too long—but not yet! If you would like some help with your writing, or just some encouragement,  contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

Lots and Lots

by Nancy Casey

Abundance. Multitudes. Much. Many.

What is there lots and lots of?

Think about that as you set up your page: draw a line at the top of the page where the title will go. Set aside some space for illustration.

Today, write about something—or many things—that are abundant in your world. You can consider your own life and memory, what you can observe right in front of you, or some ideas about the world at large.

Consider your own immediate surroundings. What sorts of material things do you collect? Do you collect them by accident or on purpose? What collects around you whether you like it or not?

When you go out, what do you notice everywhere? As the season changes, does anything new appear in large quantities?

Consider your interior landscape. Are there types of thoughts that return again and again? Certain kinds of images that parade frequently across the movie screen of your mind?

You can frame scarcity in terms of abundance by describing your many wishes to have something that you don’t.

Sometimes abundance can bubble over and become a problem of “too much.” Too much of a good thing. Too much of a bad thing. Or maybe just too many things to think about.

When you notice something (in your surroundings or in your thoughts) that there is lots and lots of, start writing about it. Tell what it is and where it can be found. Make other comments if you like. You can describe it in detail, explain its history or purpose, comment on its value, or imagine the world without it.

You could find that you have so much to say about one single thing that is abundant that it fills the whole page. Or you might end up writing a page that includes many different observations about what is abundant in your world.

However it turns out, read over what you have written when the page is full. Illustrate your work if you haven’t already. Think up a title that ties everything together.

Write the title at the top of the page. Write the date on the page too, along with a signature or your initials.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. In-person Write-For-You classes could be returning to the Recovery Center before too long—but not yet! If you would like some help with your writing, or just some encouragement,  contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.