In the News

This Week at the Latah Recovery Center

Just ‘cuz it’s a snow day at ALMOST all the schools (We’re lookin’ at YOU, U of I!) doesn’t mean a day off from helping people recover from addictions and mental health issues. It’s a full week here!

Mark your calendars for our March 6, 7am fundraising breakfast! RSVPs required. Call 208-883-1045 or email this address to RSVP. Last years event was very full, with 250 attendees. Support the center, and have an inspiring breakfast learning about local recovery efforts. You can’t beat that! Contact us today!

Are you a vet? Help us reach out to area veterans! We’re trying to start some veteran specific coaching programs, and support groups. If you can help, plan to attend our informational meeting on 2/27 at either 11 or noon in the Clearwater Rm of the UI Commons. See you there!

Have you heard Recovery Radio on KRFP FM? Thursdays, 1pm. Or podcast on your favorite service anytime.

Write for You’s latest writing prompt: https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/02/11/write-for-you-a-big-fat-pen/

Here’s our February calendar. https://latahrecoverycenter.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/february-2019-at-the-latah-recovery-center.pdf

Write for You: A Big Fat Pen

by Nancy Casey

Is there really enough time in the day to do all the things that are good for you? Meditation and relaxation. Yoga and stretching. Take a walk. Catch up with a friend. Cook some nutritious food. Work on a craft project. Sleep.

There also must be time to do the things you have to do. Laundry. Go to work. Take care of certain people. Clean up after yourself. Show up for meetings and engagements.

Then there is your writing practice. Of course it’s always a good idea to write a page. In the act of writing we say to ourselves, “I am here.” Over time, the collection of pages gives you a record of who you are.

If you find it hard to make the time to write a page because you live in a continuous avalanche of “oughts” and obligations—get a fatter pen. A big fat pen.

Today, write a page using the biggest pen you can find. Or a crayon, maybe. Even your finger could work. (What could you dip it in?)

Today, write with something nice and fat. Something that forces you to write big letters. Something that will fill up the page really fast.

Lay out your page before you begin to write. Draw a line where the title will go. Set off some space for illustration. You can always doodle around in the illustration space while you are thinking about what you will write.

Write anything you want. Whatever comes to mind.

If nothing comes to mind, begin by writing down the names of things that are in front of you. You won’t run out of things to name before you run out of space on the page. Especially if you decide to add some comments or description to what you name.

You will fill up the page in no time at all. Maybe you will say, “Look at that! I’m already done!”

I hope you will also say, “This was really easy. No need to make a big deal of it.”

Maybe you will even say, “No reason not to do this again tomorrow.”

Give your work a title when you have finished. Make sure the date is on it somewhere, too. Add further decoration and color to the page as needed. Here is an example of what a person’s page could look like.

You can share what you have written by posting it as a comment below. You can type in your work. Or post a picture of it.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. She will offer writing classes in the spring. You can find more of her work here. She also available to give (free!) writing help to anyone in recovery. This can be for any kind of writing project—resumes, letters, stories novels, homework—for more information email latahrecoverycenter@gmail.com.

This Month at the Latah Recovery Center

The latest prompt from Write for You: About That Groundhog. https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/02/04/write-for-you-about-that-groundhog/

February Calendar:
https://latahrecoverycenter.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/february-2019-at-the-latah-recovery-center.pdf

I am excited to announce the Region 2 Behavioral Health Board, in partnership with Public Health-Idaho North Central District, has scheduled a FREE Train the Trainer course for the Strengthening Families Program (SFP) for Region 2. This training will take place on April 22-23, 2019 at the Lewiston Public Health Department. These will be two full day trainings, ​full participation is required to become a certified SFP trainer.
The Strengthening Families Program is a 14-session, evidence-based parenting skills, children’s social skills, and family life skills training program specifically designed for high-risk families. Parents and children participate in SFP, both separately and together. More information can be found on their website: https://www.strengtheningfamiliesprogram.org/index.html
If you are interested in becoming a Strengthening Families Program facilitator, please fill out this registration link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SFPREG
Please share this information with your colleagues.
Kind regards, ​
Sharlene Johnson, CPS
Regional Prevention Coordinator | Partnerships for Success
sjohnson@phd2.Idaho.gov (208)-816-3143

Write for You: About That Groundhog

by Nancy Casey

Have you ever been like the groundhog in the story about spring? The groundhog who wakes up, leaves its burrow, sees its shadow, runs back inside and makes spring stay away for six weeks. That is, unless it’s cloudy. When there’s no scary shadow, the groundhog stays outdoors and spring comes right away.

How does the groundhog remind you of yourself?

Notice that the groundhog isn’t a quitter. When the groundhog sets out into the world and something scary happens, it goes home to rest and think about what happened. Later it tries again and things work out.

Have you ever had that experience?

Maybe the groundhog has been reminded since the day it was born to stay out of the bright sun to avoid predators. “If you can see your own shadow,” the adults would say, “dive for cover.” If the groundhog goes outside when it’s cloudy, it learns its way around. When the sun comes out later and the groundhog sees its shadow, it knows of many safe places to go. It doesn’t need to run all the way back home to bed to stay out of danger.

Has anything like that ever happened to you?

Have you ever been in a situation where a whole lot of people had all kinds of opinions about what you were going to do, but all you wanted was to be focused on one step at a time? That’s what happens to the groundhog. It just wakes up in the morning and does its normal best. All kinds of people pass judgement, positive and negative. Everybody is talking about the groundhog. They hold the groundhog responsible for something it has no control over. (Maybe that’s the real reason why the groundhog goes back to bed to hide.)

How do you think the Spring feels about all this? Spring has been working and pushing all season, trying to warm up the world and when it succeeds—that timid little groundhog who slept the whole winter through gets all the credit!

What about all the other groundhogs? Do they select someone to go out first? Is it a job that groundhogs want? Is the first groundhog some kind of rebel, pioneer, or outcast? Do they throw a going-away party? If the first groundhog stays out, do the others quickly follow? Are some parents more strict about safety than others?

Even in a year when the groundhog runs right back inside for six weeks, sooner or later all the groundhogs are out. Sooner or later spring comes, too. By then, we’ll have forgetten the groundhog story until next February. What other stories remind you of February?

Today, write a page about something that has something to do with the groundhog story.

Lay out your page before you begin to write. Draw a line where the title will go. Set off some space for illustration. You can always doodle around in the illustration space while you are thinking about what you will write.

Give your work a title when you have finished. Make sure the date is on it somewhere, too. Add further decoration and color to the page as needed.

Here is an example of what a person could write.

You can share what you have written by posting it as a comment below. You can type in your work. Or post a picture of it.


Nancy Casey
has lived in Latah County for many years. She will offer writing classes in the spring. You can find more of her work here. She is also available to give (free!) writing help to anyone in recovery. This can be for any kind of writing project—resumes, letters, stories, novels, homework, anything. For more information email latahrecoverycenter@gmail.com.

This Week at the Latah Recovery Center

The LRC is reaching out to help area veterans by setting up some support and coaching groups. Informational meeting 2/27 11 AND noon at UI Clearwater Rm. Please see the attachment to find out more.

The latest writing prompt from Write for You: https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/01/28/write-for-you-take-a-seat/

We are still looking for a few more table captains to help at our March 6, 7am fundraising breakfast. Our goal is to have 40 table captains, and we currently have 31. Desired qualifications:
A. Have friends?
B. Like to eat breakfast?
C. Can you roll out of bed in time for a 7am breakfast?
Answer yes to A and B? You are qualified to help! (We KNOW you can do C…)Contact Darrell at this email address to find out how.

Here’s our calendar:
https://latahrecoverycenter.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/January-2019-at-the-Latah-Recovery-Center.pdf

Write for You: Take a Seat

by Nancy Casey

Sometimes we sit to rest. Sometimes we sit and work. We sit on things and under them. We sit beside people and other living things. We sit straight. We slouch. Today, write about some of the places or situations you can imagine yourself sitting.

Set up your page first. Draw a line at the top where the title will go. Set aside some space for an illustration—even if you don’t consider yourself an “artist.” Drawing or doodling will offer an opportunity for your mind to relax and make the most of the ideas that rustle around in your mind while you are writing—even the ideas you never write down.

Chances are you are sitting down to do your writing. You could begin by describing where and how you are sitting right now. Or you can imagine other places you could be sitting. Where do you like to sit?

Can you imagine yourself sitting with someone? A friend? A character from a book? A person who no longer walks the earth?

How do you like to sit? Do you curl one or both legs under you? Plant your feet on the floor? Cross your ankles? Lean back into pillows or a soft chair? Would you rather sit on the floor? Would you rather sit outside or inside?

If you could sit anywhere, real or imagined, where would that place be? What would you see from that spot—buildings, bicycles, flowers, frying pans, someone you know? What would you hear? What would you be wearing?

Where have you sat in the past? Is there a place where you used to sit often? Is there anywhere you will never sit again? What do you remember about sitting in these places?

Write anything at all about your sitting self. You can write the full truth as you remember it, or you can write something entirely made up.

Maybe your writing will come out like a list, or series of sentences that begin something like, “I would sit…” Perhaps you will have so much to say about one particular place to sit that you will fill up the whole page describing it.

However your writing comes out, add some kind of doodle or illustration to the page. Often, while you are drawing, a good title will occur to you. Make sure the date is on the page somewhere, too. Here is an example of what a person could write.

You can share what you have written by posting it as a comment below. You can type in your work. Or post a picture of it.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. Sometimes she teaches writing classes at the Recovery Center. You can find more of her work here. She offers (free!) writing help to anyone in recovery. This can be for any kind of writing project—resumes, letters, stories novels—email latahrecoverycenter@gmail.com for more information.