In the News

A List, Plus…

by Nancy Casey

Sit yourself down in front of a scene or a situation. It can be somewhere in your home, at work, or in public. Somewhere indoors or out. A café, a park, a hallway—anywhere.

Get your page ready. Mark off a space that you will use for illustration. Draw a line across the top of the page to save space for a title. (Don’t write the actual title until after you have filled up the page.)

Settle in. Take in your surroundings. Try to use all of your senses.

Along the left-hand side of the page, write a list of what comes into your awareness. You could write down the names of things that you can see. Can you also write the names of sounds or tastes or textures? Write down words that match what you take in from your surroundings.

Keep adding items to your list until you reach the bottom of the page. Draw a line that separates the long column of words from the rest of the page.

Read over the words slowly. Think about them.

In the big, empty space on the rest of the page, begin writing. Write about anything that you want, real or imagined. As you write, include as many of the words on the left-hand side of the page as you possibly can.

You could, for example, describe what’s in front of you, using the words on your list to guide you along.

You could make up an entire scene or story that uses words from your list and has nothing to do with what’s in front of you.

If you get stuck or don’t know what to write, pick a random word on the list and write something about it. You can work your way down the whole page like that, picking one word at a time.

If you get completely stuck, draw or doodle in your illustration space. Glance at your list now and again. Eventually an idea for what to write will pop into your mind.

After you have filled the page, look it over carefully. Make small changes if you need to. When you are satisfied with the page, give it a title and write the date on it, too. Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. She taught the Write-For-You writing class at the Recovery Center last summer and will return again in the spring. For more information about classes and writing certificates, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Community Center.

Yucky Food

by Nancy Casey

There’s no accounting for taste. There are foods that other people love that you absolutely can’t stand. What are they?

Are there foods that make you shudder? Are there foods that make you gag? Are there foods that you dislike so much that you can’t even stand watching someone else eat them?

Are you allergic to any foods? What happens if you eat them?

Today, write about the foods you never eat—if you can help it.

Draw a line at the top of the page so there’s room to put a title later. Reserve a little bit of space for illustration or doodling.

Print the name of a yucky (to you) food in capital letters.  Next to the name of the food, write a little bit about your relationship with that food. What is disgusting about it? How does it feel in your mouth? What does it remind you of? Have you ever tasted it? Who likes it?

When you finish with that food, print the name of another food you find awful, and tell something about that.

Fill up the page that way, writing about the foods that you don’t eat.

When you have finished writing, reread your work. Make small changes if you need to. When you are satisfied with the page, give it a title and write the date on it, too.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. She taught the Write-For-You writing class at the Recovery Center last summer and will return again in the spring. For more information about classes and writing certificates, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Community Center.

This Week at the Latah Recovery Center

Here’s a cool offering from Jason Shull: Vibrational Sound Therapy on 12/4, 6pm.  I sat in on this last month and can attest that it was very soothing and interesting.  Like guided meditation, but different.  I hope you will give it a try.
Here’s the latest writing prompt from Write for You: https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/11/18/false-and-true/
We have some new Recovery Radio podcasts available for download on Googleplay and iTunes-check them out!
Here is our November calendar:

https://latahrecoverycenter.files.wordpress.com/2019/10/november-2019-at-the-latah-recovery-center.pdf

False and True

by Nancy Casey

Before you write this page, draw a line at the top where the title will go. You will figure out a good title after you have finished writing.

Set off some space where an illustration will go. It’s always good to add a picture or some doodles to your page. Drawing can help you think up what to write. A bit of color makes your page more interesting to look at.

Today you will write short paragraphs. Paragraphs that are exactly three sentences long…

  • One of the sentences must be true.
  • One of the sentences must be false.
  • One of the sentences can be either true or false—your choice.

The sentences can be in any order. You can start with a sentence that’s true. Or you can start with something false.

Maybe you will write two true sentences and a false one. Maybe two of your sentences will be false and only one of them true.

If another person were to read your page, maybe they will be able to tell what’s true and what’s false—or maybe they won’t.

Write as many of these three-sentence paragraphs as you can fit on the page.

When you have finished writing, reread your work. Make small changes if you need to. When you are satisfied with the page, give it a title and write the date on it, too. Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. She taught the Write-For-You writing class at the Recovery Center last summer and will return again in the spring. For more information about classes and writing certificates, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Community Center.