In the News

This Week at the Latah Recovery Center

What an exciting month August is. Students are coming back to town, with all the energy they bring. At the LRC we are planning our third anniversary celebration and National Recovery Month in September. The celebration kicks off with IROAR on August 31, then we have a birthday party on Sept. 15, and the Latah Recovery Festival on Sept. 22. More details to come!

Here’s the latest writing exercise from Write for You: https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2018/08/09/write-for-you-thanks-for-the-hospitality/

Linked is a .pdf of our August calendar for you to print and share.
https://latahrecoverycenter.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/august-2018-at-the-latah-recovery-center.pdf

In addition to our regular schedule of support meetings etc., we have the following special offerings this month:
Recovery Peer Volunteer Training Aug. 21 AND 28. This 6 hour training is for people wanting to learn how to coach and help people dealing with addiction and mental health issues! This offering is being held at First Step 4 Life recovery center in Lewiston. We need at least ten to hold the course, so please RSVP by August 19 to LatahRecoveryCenter@gmail.com
Acupuncture for Recovery Aug. 9 and 30 from 2-3pm
Recovering Parents Aug. 2, 9 , 23 and 30 5-6:30pm
Idaho Open Awareness Ride (IROAR). Help us welcome over 50 riders as they cruise throughout the state to bring awareness to recovery. We are hosting a free pancake breakfast when they come through town Aug. 31, 9-11am at the 1912 Center.
NEED SOME INSPIRATION? Recovery Radio every Thursday on KRFP at 1pm. Or download the podcast on iTunes or Googleplay.

Write for You: Thanks for the Hospitality

by Nancy Casey

We usually think of hospitality as the effort that somebody makes on behalf of a visitor or guest. Most of us have probably experienced both sides of the hospitality coin.

When we plan to receive a guest, we think about things that will make them comfortable. What will they want to eat or drink? How will I keep them amused and happy? Do they have special needs or habits I need to consider? It takes a bit of effort to be a good host.

Sometimes the hospitality is organized and formal, especially if the guest and the host don’t know each other well. Sometimes it’s very relaxed, such as when you sweep the laundry off the chair so your good friend who dropped by can sit down.

As guests, we are the ones who are away from our usual customs. We hope that we can be comfortable and that things go smoothly. When we see that someone has gone to a lot of trouble on our behalf, we appreciate that. We have lots of reasons to thank our hosts.

The writer Kathleen Norris, in her book Acedia and Me encourages people to consider “acts of hospitality to yourself.” All the efforts that you make to keep your home clean and comfortable. The meals that you organize for yourself. The plans you make so that you can do things that you enjoy. The money you spend to improve your life.

All day long we do things to make ourselves feel welcome and comfortable in our own lives. We are our own guests and we are our own hosts.

Today in your writing practice, write a thank you note. The guest half of you will write a thank you note to the host half of you to thank you for all the efforts you make just for you.

A good way for a guest to write a thank you note is to identify a couple of different things that you know the host did just for you. Then for each one, say what they did and tell why that was a nice thing for you.

When you have finished your note, give it a title. (Even though thank-you notes, don’t usually have titles on them—this one is just for you.) Make sure the date is on it somewhere, too. Add decoration and color to the page as needed. Here is an example of what a person could write.

Share what you have written! Post it as a comment below. You can type in your work. Or post a picture of it.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. Sometimes she teaches writing classes at the Recovery Center. You can find more of her work here. She offers (free!) writing help to anyone in recovery. This can be for any kind of writing project—resumes, letters, stories novels—email latahrecoverycenter@gmail.com for more information

Write for You: It’s Cool in the Library

by Nancy Casey

You can use your writing practice to ride out a heat wave if you take yourself on a field trip to the delicious air conditioning in the public library—and write about it.

If you aren’t a big reader of books, you might doubt that there can be much in the library for you. The library has a lot more to offer than books, however. You can think of it as a place for people who are curious about the world. If the world is feeling a little dull to you, the library can make it interesting again.

Unlike a store, a restaurant, or a movie theater, you don’t need money in your pockets to enjoy what’s in the library. The only rules are basic manners: keep your voice down, be polite, and don’t break or steal things.

Libraries are a perfect place for shy people. You don’t have to mingle or talk to strangers. You don’t even have to talk to the people you know. You can relax in a good seat at the edge of the room and watch what’s happening—or just fool around on your phone. Nobody will think you are a wallflower who doesn’t know how to make small talk. They’ll just think you are someone who happens to be in the library.

There is plenty to look at in the library. Usually a display or two with interesting things to check out. Bulletin boards with information about the community. Children doing the goofy and clever things that children do. All types of people just being people.

You can learn about anything in a library. Librarians are trained to help you find anything you are looking for. They like it when you ask. A librarian can point you to books, magazines, CDs, DVDs, and computers where you can learn about things you care about.

Wander around and see what kinds of books they have. Books in the sections on arts and crafts can show you the huge variety of things that people can make. You can even learn how to make them if you are so inclined. Do you like science, or history? Music and poetry? Weightlifting? Rocks? Bikes? Animals? Religion? Classic cars? It’s all in the library somewhere.

You can pull any book at all off the shelf just to ask yourself, “What’s this all about?” Open it up, page through it, and put it back. It’s fun to wander around and allow yourself to be impressed with all the things a person could know.

You don’t have to read books to enjoy them. “Oversize” books are some of the best. These are the books that are too tall to fit on the regular shelves and weigh a ton. They tend to be full of amazing photographs—art, cities, wildlife, outer space, people, and anything else you can imagine. You can lug a couple of them to a table, turn the pages and enjoy what you see.

You can flip through magazines, too. New ones or old ones. Look at pictures and advertising, read a story or two. You can also read the newspaper.

For your writing practice today, take yourself on a field trip to the library. Expect the unexpected. Relax. Beat the heat. Write about what you see, hear, do and think.

Whatever you end up writing, give your work a title. Make sure the date is on it somewhere, too. Add decoration and color to the page as needed. Here is an example of what a person could write.

Share what you have written! Post it as a comment below. You can type in your work. Or post a picture of it.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. Sometimes she teaches writing classes at the Recovery Center. You can find more of her work here. She offers (free!) writing help to anyone in recovery. This can be for any kind of writing project—resumes, letters, stories novels—email latahrecoverycenter@gmail.com for more information.

August at the Latah Recovery Center

Linked is a .pdf of our August calendar for you to print and share.
https://latahrecoverycenter.files.wordpress.com/2018/07/august-2018-at-the-latah-recovery-center.pdf

In addition to our regular schedule of support meetings etc., we have the following special offerings this month:
Recovery Peer Volunteer Training Aug. 21 AND 28. This 6 hour training is for people wanting to learn how to coach and help people dealing with addiction and mental health issues! This offering is being held at First Step 4 Life recovery center in Lewiston. We need at least ten to hold the course, so please RSVP by August 19 to LatahRecoveryCenter@gmail.com
Acupuncture for Recovery Aug. 2, 9 and 30 from 2-3pm
Recovering Parents Aug. 2, 9 , 23 and 30 5-6:30pm
Idaho Open Awareness Ride (IROAR). Help us welcome over 50 riders as they cruise throughout the state to bring awareness to recovery. We are hosting a free pancake breakfast when they come through town Aug. 31, 9-11am at the 1912 Center.
PEER Social Activity: Airway Hills Golf! Sat. Aug. 4, 6pm. RSVP rodsprague@nethere.com
NEED SOME INSPIRATION? Recovery Radio every Thursday on KRFP at 1pm. Or download the podcast on iTunes or Googleplay.

 

August 2018 at the Latah Recovery Center

This Week at the Latah Recovery Center

This weeks Write for You prompt: https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2018/07/23/write-for-you-reading-the-world/

Have you heard Recovery Radio? Thurdsdays on KRFP, 1pm. Or anytime on podcast. Check iTunes or Googleplay!

Special offerings this week:
7/26 Recovering Parents group 5-6:30pm
7/28 Learn How to Crochet and Calm Your Mind 10-Noon
7/30 Recovery Peer Volunteer Meeting 6pm

Here’s our regular calendar!
July at the Latah Recovery Center
Alcoholics Anonymous Every day, noon
Positive Affirmations Mondays, 12-1
Life Skills Mondays, 5-6
Refuge Recovery 420 E. 2nd St Mondays, 6
Narcotics Anonymous Mondays, 6 Tuesdays (Womens mtg) 5:30, Fridays 5:30
Recovery Peer Volunteer Meeting Last Monday of month, 6pm
Yoga (Hosted by Moscow Yoga Ctr) Tuesdays 12:30-1:30
Chess w/Steve Tues and Thurs 5-6
Free Meal or Snack Sponsored by Good Sam Tuesdays, 5:30-out of food
Prescription Addiction Support Group Tuesdays 7-8
Positive Affirmations Wednesdays 5-6
Recovery International: Mental Health Self-Help Wednesdays, 6:30-8
Acupuncture for Recovery with Megan Baumgartner Thursday July 12 and 19, 2-3pm
New Volunteer Orientation Thursdays 4-5
Recovering Parents w/Katie Stinson Thursdays July 12, 19 and 26 5-6:30
Peaceful Art Practices Thursdays 5-6
LAMI: Family Support Program 2nd Thurs of month 7-8:30
All Recovery Meeting Fridays 5-6
Movie/Games: Check website for listing Fridays 6:30-9
PEER Social Activity: Picnic at Ghormley Park Saturday, July 14 1-5
AA Speakers Meeting 3rd Saturday of month, 11-2:30
Learn How to Crochet & Calm Your Mind 4th Sat of month, 10-12
Adult Children of Alcoholics, Women’s Meeting Sundays 6-7:30
Classes and Groups are ALWAYS FREE OR AT COST AND OPEN TO ALL.
RSVP LatahRecoveryCenter@gmail.com Bolded Date=Regular offering. Plain text=Special offering for month.
Need an understanding person to talk to? We have Recovery Peer Volunteers here to help you in recovery from mental health and addiction issues all hours of operation. We are here to help!

Write for You: Reading the World

Reading the World

by Nancy Casey

Some people read books, but everybody reads. Today in your writing, describe the reading that you do that isn’t traditional book-reading.

Walking around town, we read things whether we want to or not. Think about the word Exit, for instance or the names of businesses along the street. Do words jump out at you from billboards or people’s clothing? At a traffic light, you read symbols to know when it’s safe to proceed.

Do you read on a device like a phone or a computer? Are you a reader of social media? Do you read short things or long things? Sometimes you probably read pictures. Do you prefer to read pictures that are still or pictures that move? Do you like there to be silence or sound with your pictures? Do you like words with the pictures?

All kinds of reading take place on the job. Some people read words on paper, others read numbers. A person reads a machine when they watch what it is doing and know when they should intervene.

It might seem odd to think about reading that doesn’t involve words. We read words to understand or imagine things and, maybe learn something, too. But we learn and understand from paying attention to lots of things, words included. In that sense, we are reading the world around us all the time.

We read social situations in order to decide where to sit or stand in a room. We read people’s faces and figure out all kinds of things. What can you figure out from reading the sky?

Today in your writing, describe some of the ways that you read words and read the world. Tell what you learn from what you read. What kinds of reading in the world do you like the most?

When you have finished, give your work a title. Make sure the date is on it somewhere, too. Add decoration and color to the page as needed. Here is an example of what a person could write.

Share what you have written! Post it as a comment below. You can type in your work. Or post a picture of it.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. Sometimes she teaches writing classes at the Recovery Center. You can find more of her work here. She offers (free!) writing help to anyone in recovery. This can be for any kind of writing project—resumes, letters, stories novels—email latahrecoverycenter@gmail.com for more information

Write for You: Back and Forth

by Nancy Casey

Write down a fact. A one-sentence fact. Any old fact.

You can describe something that’s in front of you or tell something about a memory. You could choose a fact that comes into your mind from the media, or from friends. Just some random fact.

The fact should take up about one line on the page.

Start a new line. Write new a sentence related to the fact. Write something that turns the fact into a bummer. Do this by adding new information that twists the fact around. Make the new sentence sound depressing somehow, or gloomy. It doesn’t even have to be true.

  • For example, a person could begin by writing: There is strawberry ice cream in the freezer.
  • Then they could follow up: At my cousin’s fifth birthday party, I threw up strawberry ice cream all over the cake.

After that sentence, start a new line. This time write a sentence that takes an idea from the gloomy sentence and turns the “conversation” cheerful or positive.

  • For example, a person could follow the bummer recollection of throwing up at a cousin’s birthday party with something like: When I was growing up, my cousin was my best friend.

Then use that positive-sounding sentence as a springboard to say something gloomy or depressing. Maybe something like: In grade school, my best friend moved away and I never saw her again.

Continue down the page, that way, writing sentences that take turns changing the subject and swinging from positive to negative, back and forth like a rocking horse.

Just go sentence by sentence. Don’t pressure yourself to tell a coherent story. You can write things that are true, or completely made up, or somewhere in between. The important thing is to make the attitude swing from gloomy to cheerful, and back, and forth.

When you are three-quarters of the way down the page, stop. Draw a squiggly line under what you have written. Go back and read it over. Make small changes if you like.

Finally, in the little bit of space left on the page, comment on what you wrote. How did you have to make your mind work to change the attitude with every single sentence? Was it easy, hard, or a little of both? Were parts of the writing funny or annoying? Does the page you wrote seem like two people talking, or is it more like one person having a discussion with their own thoughts?

Write comments for the rest of the page, and when your work is finished, give it a title. Make sure the date is on the page somewhere, too. Add decoration and color as needed. Here is an example of what a person could write.

Share what you have written! Post it as a comment below. You can type in your work. Or post a picture of it.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. Sometimes she teaches writing classes at the Recovery Center. You can find more of her work here. She offers (free!) writing help to anyone in recovery. This can be for any kind of writing project—resumes, letters, stories novels—email latahrecoverycenter@gmail.com for more information.