In the News

Latah Recovery Festival and our weekly announcements

The Latah Recovery Center is inviting the public to acelebration of people in recovery. This is our 4th birthday and our3rd annual Recovery Festival. It will to be held September 28, 2019at the Latah County Fairgrounds Events Center. The birthday bash will be from 2-4 PM and the Recovery Festival from 4-8PM.  There will be live music, children’sgames and activities, a chili cook-off, personal stories of recovery journeys,key note speech from Joyce Lyons from Idaho Public Health, and fun funfun.  For more information about this event, including entering chili in the chili cook-off, call the Latah RecoveryCenter at 208-883-1045, visit our website at latahrecoverycenter.com or ourFacebook page.If you missed

The Opioid Crisis Hits Home on Saturday, you missed a real tear jerker.  We displayed 236 pairs of shoes and balloons.  These represented the people killed last year by an opioid addiction in Idaho.  Six in Latah.  Click here for some pictures:https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/09/24/the-opioid-crisis-hits-home/
This weeks writing exercise: https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/09/23/where-there-are-people/
September Calendar:https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/09/04/september-lrc-calendar-is-out/

Where There Are People

by Nancy Casey

To accomplish your writing today, you must take yourself on a field trip to a place where there are people. Anywhere, as long as there is at least one person.

Such a field trip could be a walk down a busy street, a meal in a restaurant, a trip to the library, or an evening with friends or family. It could be an event or situation from a workplace, a gym, or a church. Take yourself to a place where you will find one or more people.

If it’s not possible to take yourself physically to such a place, you can go in your imagination instead. One way to do that is to remember things. Another way to do that is to make things up.

Once you are immersed in your field trip, begin writing down the details of the place and situation. Here is the catch: Don’t write anything about the people.

Suppose you are meeting a friend for lunch and you decide to make that outing count as your field trip. As you eat and visit with your friend, collect details that you can write down later. Notice how the food smells, the color of the plates, the pictures on the restaurant wall and the cars parked outside. These are the things you will write about. You won’t be writing anything about your companion, the server, or your fellow diners. Even if somebody’s baby screams through the whole meal, a baby is a person, so you can’t write about that.

If you travel in your imagination, take some time for the trip. As you recall an event or situation with people in it, often the details of the people are what pop into your mind first. Close your eyes and let other memories of the moment filter in. What was in the sky and on the ground? What objects were behind or in front of the people? Are there sounds and smells that you remember? Was there anything soft or rough to the touch?

You can make up some or all of the details that you decide to put in your description. You can try to make your made-up details seems absolutely convincing. Or you can make them entirely fanciful.

When you have filled a page, reread your work. Make small changes if you need to. Perhaps you will add decoration or illustration. When you are satisfied with the page, give it a title and write the date on it, too. Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like to do this exercise or others like it with a group of people, come to the Write-for-You class at the Latah Recovery Center on Thursdays at 5pm. Anyone can join. Just show up! You can attend just for fun or work to earn a writing certificate. For more information, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Community Center.

Adding Crisis Services at Latah Recovery Center-and Weekly Announcements

We’ve had a lot of questions about the crisis services we are adding.    This article does an excellent job of describing the effort.  Ask questions if you have them.    https://lmtribune.com/northwest/in-times-of-crisis-help-is-here/article_d80958be-ff06-5223-b824-444ab9df931d.html
TONIGHT and TOMORROW we have Recovery Peer Volunteer Training, 6-9pm at the LRC.  If you want to learn how to coach people in behavioral health recovery this is an excellent introduction.  AND, it’s part of the eligibility requirements for our more advanced volunteer levels!
Don’t miss: https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/09/16/drug-impairment-training-for-educational-pros-training-10-3/
Here’s the latest writing prompt from Write for You: https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/09/16/when-the-rain-comes/
We still have two GREAT National Recovery Month events coming up:9/21-morning:  Stop by the steps Moscow City Hall for a devastating display on the deaths in Idaho caused by Opioids.9/28-2-8 at the fairgrounds is our annual recovery festival.  Food, fun, and inspiration are guaranteed.
Here’s the September calendar.https://latahrecoverycenter.org/2019/09/04/september-lrc-calendar-is-out/

When the Rain Comes

by Nancy Casey

In times of drought, the natural world shrivels. Both plants and animals use every trick they know to prevent themselves from dying of thirst. Some seek shade, some are only active at night, others allow less essential parts of themselves to die and fall away.

And then it rains.

Here on the Palouse, the weather is turning. It has been hot and dusty for weeks. The wet season is arriving. For your writing today, notice the way everything under the sky changes as water becomes abundant again. Record some thoughts about that.

Perhaps it is raining right now. Where do the drops land? How do they change the colors, sounds, and smells around you? How do plants and animals react? What’s different about dirt and pavement? Is there anything different about you?

Sometimes the world is so dry that when it first rains, nothing seems to get wet.

When too much rain comes too fast at the end of a drought, floods and destruction can occur.

Sometimes rain can make things that seem dead come alive again.

Maybe it hasn’t rained yet, but rain is “in the air.” What does that mean? How can you tell?

Rain, or the promise of it, can send a person scurrying to bring in or cover up things that aren’t supposed to get wet. Forgotten things can get ruined because it’s hard to re-acquire habits of keeping things dry.

Going from drought to rain can bring changes in a person’s body and mind. Do you or anyone you know experience these changes?

The idea of rain after drought can also be a metaphor. A person can be thirsty for many things besides water—knowledge, friendship, travel, or relief from pain, just to name a few. What happens to a person when this kind of thirst is quenched or about to be quenched? Does anything come back to life? Might there be floods and destruction?

Fill a page with some ideas about rain after a drought. Perhaps you will write about the actual rain and drought. Maybe you will write about something that rain and drought remind you of. You can write about yourself, but you don’t have to. You could write from the point of view of a plant, an animal, or even a lawn chair.

Leave some space to draw or doodle on the page if you like. If you aren’t sure what to write, drawing and doodling can quiet your mind so ideas can spring up—like mushrooms after the rain!

When you have finished writing, reread your work. Make small changes if you need to. When you are satisfied with the page, give it a title and write the date on it, too. Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.

Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like to do this exercise or others like it with a group of people, come to the Write-for-You class at the Latah Recovery Center on Thursdays at 5pm. Anyone can join. Just show up! You can attend just for fun or work to earn a writing certificate. For more information, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Community Center.