That Super-Tiny Stuff

by Nancy Casey

Although you might not want it anywhere, you can find it just about everywhere: in the sky, on the ground, in your shoes, under the bed, even in outer space. In can make you bat your eyelashes, or bring on an asthma attack. If you get Covid, it can feel like your brain is full of it.

Today, write about dust.

Clear the dust from your mind and your workspace and set yourself up to write.

Arrange your writing stuff in front of you so it looks pleasing to you. Take a breath or two. Wiggle around a little to loosen yourself up.

Draw a line at the top of the page where your title will go. Set aside some space for illustration if you like. Start drawing or doodling in it if it helps your mind focus.

What, exactly, is dust anyway? Where does it come from? What does it turn into when it’s not dust anymore? You could write about that.

You could write about all the dust that you can see from where you are sitting.

What are some of the best ways to get rid of dust? If you get it wet, is it still dust?

Another possibility would be to write about all the ways that dust can be annoying. Or all the places and spaces where there is dust and it really doesn’t bother you.

If you want to get scientific, you could gather up some dust and look at it with a magnifying glass. Do dust particles have different sizes, shapes and colors?

The phrase dust to dust comes from the Bible. What does that mean? Do you think it’s true?

Dust can be a metaphor, too. What does it mean if you say your mind or your memory is filled with dust? Can that happen to a relationship? What if you are left in the dust? Have you ever been dusted off? Or dusted up? What happens when the dust settles?

Do you have a story you can tell in which dust plays a role? Has dust ever made your day, or ruined your plans?

Write down the first idea that comes into your mind. Most people keep getting ideas once they start writing. (If you don’t, doodle on the page somewhere so you don’t stop “writing.”)

When you have filled up the page, look back over your work. Add illustration or decoration if you like.

Do your ideas form any kind of a pattern? Do they seem to be about a bigger idea that you hadn’t really planned on writing about? If they do, maybe you can use that insight to think up a title. If they don’t, make up some kind of a title anyway and write it at the top of the page.

Put your initials or a signature on the page, too. And write the date on it. Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like some help or encouragement with any kind of writing project, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

Questions, Questions

by Nancy Casey

There are a lot more questions in this world than answers. Today in your writing, have a little fun asking questions. Skip the answers. Just ask the questions.

First, get your page set up. Draw a line at the top of the page where your title will go. A good way to set aside space for illustration is to draw a frame around the page that you can decorate, either now or later.

Write the letters of the alphabet, A-Z down the left-hand side of the page.

For each letter, write a question that uses a word that begins with that letter.

You can start with “A” and work your way down the page. Or you can skip around.

Maybe you will know the answers to the questions you ask, and maybe you won’t.

To be creative with your question-making, think about the basic question words, the ones that start with “W.” Who, what, when, where, why?

There is also How? As in How many…? Or How does…?

Yes-or-no questions are a possibility. They might start out with Does…? Or Is…?

Sometimes you can make a question more interesting if it uses words like if or would somehow.

Write down the first idea that comes into your mind, and then just keep going.

When you have filled up the page, read through all of your questions. Add illustration or decoration if you like.

Do your questions form any kind of a pattern or seem to tell a story? Do they seem to be about a bigger idea that you hadn’t really planned on writing about? If they do, maybe you can use that insight to think up a title. If they don’t, make up some kind of a title anyway and write it at the top of the page.

Put your initials or a signature on the page, too. And write the date on it. Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like some help or encouragement with any kind of writing project, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

What is the Sky?

by Nancy Casey

Go outside, look up, and there it is—the sky.

What is the sky anyway? What is it made of? How far does it go? If something is in the sky, is it part of the sky?

Today, write a page about the sky.

With the sky on your mind, get out your writing stuff. Arrange it in a way that looks pleasing to you. Take a breath or two. Wiggle around a little to loosen yourself up.

Draw a line at the top of the page where your title will go. Set aside some space for illustration if you like. Start drawing or doodling in it if it helps your mind focus. If your mind feels empty of ideas, doodling, drawing, or even simply scribbling, relaxes your mind and gently draws your focus to the writing task. When an idea comes, you’ll be ready to write it down.

You can consider the sky from the viewpoint of a scientist and write down ways that it can be observed and measured. What would be different if you considered the sky from a religious viewpoint? What is the sky like if you take the viewpoint of a dog or a plant?

You could write down a story that has the sky in it. Your story could be true or made up—or both.

Is it possible to write a whole page of questions about the sky? Or a whole page of statements about the sky that are false?

You could divide your page into two parts, label them “Day” and “Night” and write thoughts and observations about the sky appropriate to each heading. What other headings could you use instead of “Day” and “Night?” Now and Then? Winter and Summer? Child and Adult?

As you relax into your writing task, write down the first idea that comes into your mind. Don’t hold out for a “good” idea. Most people keep getting more ideas once they start writing. (If you don’t, doodle some more. If you fill your whole page with doodling…well, you filled a page!) Whatever idea you begin with, chances are your ideas will get more and more interesting as your work your way down the page.

When you have filled up the page, look back over your work. Add illustration or decoration if you like.

Do your ideas form any kind of a pattern? Do they seem to be about a bigger idea that you hadn’t really planned on writing about? If they do, maybe you can use that insight to think up a title. If they don’t, make up some kind of a title anyway and write it at the top of the page.

Put your initials or a signature on the page, too. And write the date on it. Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. If you would like some help or encouragement with any kind of writing project, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.