At Three

by Nancy Casey

What do you do? Even though that’s a question that many people ask, lots of folks find it too big to give an answer that feels satisfactory.

What do you do all day? That question is smaller, but it can still be hard to answer.

What do you do at 3 o’clock? That question is whittled down to an answerable size.

Take a moment to consider the ebbs and cycles of your waking day. Try to get a sense of the whole day all at once as something that unfolds from start to finish. Then zero in on that more-or-less 3 o’clock time. What’s going on then?

It depends.  On who you are, the schedule you tend to keep, the responsibilities you have, and your typical flows of energy and emotion. It also depends on whether the “3 o’clock” of your waking day is 3 AM or 3 PM.

It could also depend on how similar your days are. Work days differ from days off. Travel days are different from days at home.

Days might differ socially, too. Some days might or might not have children in them, or certain friends and co-workers. Maybe you have a standing appointment on a certain day at 3 o’clock.

If all of your days tend to be different, pick out a certain type of day, and picture yourself around 3 o’clock. If all of your days unfold more or less alike, zoom in on what is usually going on at three.

Think about your responsibilities and activities. Where could someone find you at 3 o’clock?

Consider the way your energy changes in the day. Where does it land around three? What about your attitude?

Is there something reliable about the natural world that occurs during the 3 o’clock hour?

Fill a page with information about yourself at 3 o’clock. Include color, drawing, doodling and decoration as you find appropriate.

When the page is full, take a good look at it, and make small changes if you like. Give your work a title and write the date on it, too.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. Since it’s not possible to have an in-person Write-For-You class at the Recovery Center, if you are interested in writing coaching, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

 

How Do You Beat the Heat?

by Nancy Casey

It depends on what heats you up.

Some people don’t notice it’s getting warm until they’ve been seared by the sun for hours. Others prefer the temperatures you might find in a cave.

Weather conditions aren’t the only thing that can make a person hot. Some people have jobs near machinery that gives off heat. Other folks have physical conditions that send their temperatures up. Sometimes it’s a lack of ventilation that makes it hard to stay cool. Or large pets who want to be on your lap.

Warmth in your body isn’t the only way to feel heat. (After all, some people can’t ever get warm enough.)

Certain emotions and mental states can make us run hot: anger, anxiety, worry. Can hunger make you too hot? Thirst probably can. What about joy?

Today for your writing, think about what has a tendency to heat you up and write about what you do to prevent yourself from overheating. Maybe you will write about keeping your physical body comfortable. Maybe you will write about your favorite strategies for remaining mentally and emotionally cool.

Begin by drawing a line across the top of your page where the title will go. Draw and doodle a little bit on the page. As you do this, your writing ideas will start to gather themselves. Start writing about the first idea that comes clearly into your mind, even if it’s not the idea you thought you would be writing about at first.

Go back and forth between writing and drawing if you like. The important thing is to fill the page somehow with ideas about staying cool when things could get too hot.

Be sure to give your work a title and write the date on it, too.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. Since it’s not possible to have an in-person Write-For-You class at the Recovery Center, if you are interested in writing coaching, contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

 

New Season Ahead!

by Nancy Casey

We have just finished a string of cold, wet, overcast days. The coming forecast promises blue skies and sunshine. It’s going to get hot. Gradually, we’re entering a new season.

Does it feel like the beginning of summer to you? What comes into your mind when you imagine the summer ahead?

As you set up your page, let your mind ramble on the idea of the summer season which stretches before you.

Summer isn’t just about weather. Summer clothes and summer shoes might pop into your mind. Or hair styles. Chores and activities. Fantasy plans. Foods and allergies. People. How one summer can be different from another. What you are and aren’t looking forward to.

Draw a line at the top where the title will go, and mark off some space that you can use for doodling and illustration. At the very bottom of the page, draw a rectangle that’s about an inch high and as wide as the page.

Write about the summer that is stretching ahead. You could write sentences that begin with, “I hope…” or “I’ll wear…” or “On Wednesdays…” Write whatever comes to your mind from thinking about the coming summer.

When your mind goes blank for writing, draw or doodle in the illustration space. Go back to writing whenever a thought you could write down pops into your mind. Go back and forth with writing and illustration until the page is full. But leave the rectangle at the bottom completely empty.

When you are satisfied with all of the drawing and writing on the page, direct your attention to the blank rectangle. That’s the space reserved for the unexpected. Because something unexpected always happens. All sorts of things that you can’t predict are going to present themselves to you this summer.

Decorate all around the edge of the rectangle somehow. As you do so, remind yourself that for better or for worse, along with everything you are pretty sure will happen, things you didn’t expect will also pop into your life over the summer.

When you have finished decorating all around the edges of the rectangle, you’ll probably be about as ready for the unexpected as you can get.

Be sure to give your work a title and write the date on it, too.

Here is an example of what someone could write.

You can share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. She occasionally teaches a Write-For-You class at the Recovery Center and offers free online writing coaching for people in recovery. For information contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center.

A Letter from the Grand Hotel

by Nancy Casey

Today, your writing will take the form of a letter. You can write it to a real or imaginary person, and you don’t have to mail it.

Pretend that you have just arrived at a Grand Hotel, a splendid vacation spot with marvelous amenities and superb convenience. Write a letter telling your friend how amazing, wonderful and perfect everything is.

Here’s the catch: all the details of the letter have to be details about your very own home and surroundings.

You can tell about the services, the entertainment, and the furnishings. You can tell what makes it comfortable and pleasant. In the spirit of making lemonade from lemons, you can describe challenges or discomforts in terms of the outstanding opportunities for growth that they present to you.

You can say anything you want, as long as it is positive to the point of bragging and describes something real and factual about your home and surroundings.

Begin to set up your page by drawing a large rectangle that makes the page have a frame around it that’s about an inch wide. The frame will be your drawing space. Your title will go in the frame, too. At the very top of the page, draw a long rectangle inside the frame that the title will fit into when it comes time to write it.

Write the date at the top of the writing space like you would for a letter, and begin with “Dear So-and-So”… using a person’s real name.

If ideas for bragging up your living space come to mind right away, begin writing. Every time you have to stop and think, don’t stop your pen from moving, just move over to the drawing space and begin decorating the frame. When you get another idea for writing, move over to the writing area and continue there.

Try not to ever pause completely. Always keep your pen moving in one part of the page or another. Either decorate the frame, or add to the letter. Can you do it? Sometimes it takes practice and concentration at first, but the reward is usually a deep calming inside your mind.

As you get down to the end of the writing part of the page, sign off the way you do when you write a letter. Read over your work. Make small changes if you need to. If you haven’t yet finished decorating the page’s frame, keep working on that until you are completely satisfied with the whole page.

When a title pops into your mind, write it down in the rectangle you have saved for it.

Here is one example of what someone’s page could look like.

Share your work by posting it as a comment below. You can type it in, or take a photo of it and upload the image.


Nancy Casey has lived in Latah County for many years. You can find more of her work here. She occasionally teaches a Write-For-You class at the Recovery Center and offers free online writing coaching for people in recovery. For information contact Nancy or the Latah Recovery Center

LRC IS HIRING!

Please send your resume and cover letter to Darrell Keim, Latah Recovery Center, 531 S Main, Moscow, ID 83843 by June 25. Or email latahrecoverycenter@gmail.com.

Latah Recovery Center

Master’s Level Clinician

Job Description

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Salary Range: $22-26

General Information:        

This is a part time exempt position that reports directly to the Latah Recovery Center Executive Director and receives clinical oversight by the staff of the Rural Crisis Center Network.

Summary:                

This position works with participants entering our programs via either a Rural Crisis Center or a Recovery Community Center.  The clinician provides:

  1.  Risk Assessment and Crisis Management

Typical responsibilities:  applies clinical skills to assess client/family safety; employs standard suicide assessment measures; provides best practice crisis interventions to ensure safety.

  • Crisis Therapy and Case Management

Typical responsibilities: works with the client to identify supports, access resources and develop a safety plan, provides emergency, crisis intervention, and after hours on-call services.

  • Consultation/supervision

Typical responsibilities: Provides supervision for non-licensed crisis center staff.  Group supervision includes reviewing crisis center interventions, documentation, safety planning.

  • Rural education and outreach

Typical responsibilities:  Weekly outreach and educational efforts in rural Latah county.  May include trainings, consultation and volunteer recruitment.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities: 

The Clinician shall be responsible for carrying out the following duties:

  1. Risk assessment, crisis therapy and other clinical assistance of Crisis Center and Recovery Community Center participants.
  2. Work with existing staff and volunteers to improve existing peer coaching program.
  3. Cultivate positive relations within the team, peers, and external parties. 
  4. Support growth and program development in all areas of the Center.
  5. Keep current client documentation, reports and proposals. 
  6. Other duties as assigned by the Executive Director or Rural Crisis Center Network.

Supervisory Responsibilities:   

The Clinician will supervise bachelor level non-licensed peer specialists and recovery coaches relative to their work in the Crisis Center.  The clinician may supervise interns as needed.

Job Relationships: 

The Clinician will attend all regular staff meetings, committee meetings of the board as assigned, and meetings of the board of directors as assigned.  Regular contact with the Executive Director, Rural Crisis Center Network lead staff, board committee chairs, and staff shall be required to maintain a current coordination and awareness of agency-wide issues.

Qualification Requirements/Education and/or Experience:   

A Master’s Degree (or higher) in a direct clinical practice Human Services field is required for this position.  (Master’s Degree in social work, psychology, marriage and family counseling, marriage and family therapy, psychosocial rehabilitation counseling, psychiatric nursing, or very closely related field of study).  Licensure with the State of Idaho as an LMSW, LCP, LCSW or LCPC with Supervisor certification is preferred.

Language Skills:   

Excellent written and verbal English is required.  

Mathematical and Computer Skills:     

Knowledge of Electronic Health Record software such as WITS or ability and wiliness to learn are required.

Ethical Considerations:

The Crisis Center is a health facility.  As such, HIPAA regulations apply.  Confidentiality protocol applies to all interactions with clients and co-workers across the combined agencies. The Clinician must support Center policies, goals and mission at all times.  This involves maintaining confidentiality regarding consumer information and internal agency information.  Additionally, the position necessitates a degree of political and social awareness required by the unique nature of the organization.